It’s All In Plato

Children who play the violin or study piano could be learning more than just Mozart. A University of Vermont College of Medicine child psychiatry team has found that musical training might also help kids focus their attention, control their emotions and diminish their anxiety. — “Could Playing Tchaikovsky and Other Music Improve Kids’ Brains?” The University of Vermont

This article popped up in my newsfeed today. Just minutes before, I had read in Plato,

. . . musical training is a more potent instrument than any other, because rhythm and harmony find their way into the inward places of the soul, on which they mightily fasten, imparting grace, and making the soul of him who is rightly educated graceful, or of him who is ill-educated ungraceful; and also because he who has received this true education of the inner being will most shrewdly perceive omissions or faults in art and nature, and with a true taste, while he praises and rejoices over and receives into his soul the good, and becomes noble and good, he will justly blame and hate the bad, now in the days of his youth, even before he is able to know the reason why; and when reason comes he will recognise and salute the friend with whom his education has made him long familiar. — The Republic, Book III

Which just goes to prove Professor Digory’s words,

It’s all in Plato, all in Plato: bless me, what do they teach them at these schools! — The Last Battle, C. S. Lewis

The Young Flute Player by Judith Leyster

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